Watson in the 21st goddamn century.
Night Librarian.
Ravenclaw.
I-40, North Carolina.

I blog about libraries, country music, propane, and propane accessories.

 

I don’t know how this happened. If you live in Chapel Hill long enough apparently you just start to look like this.

I don’t know how this happened. If you live in Chapel Hill long enough apparently you just start to look like this.

der-prinz-aus-stahl:

flyawaymax:

That’s the opposite of a problem

I’d love to know how this mistake was made. What was going through their heads at the factory?
"Are you sure it actually says 1,450?"
"Yeah, why would it be a mistake?"

der-prinz-aus-stahl:

flyawaymax:

That’s the opposite of a problem

I’d love to know how this mistake was made. What was going through their heads at the factory?

"Are you sure it actually says 1,450?"

"Yeah, why would it be a mistake?"

(Source: anditlingers)


erikkwakkel:
Sharing a binding
This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.
Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).

erikkwakkel:

Sharing a binding

This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.

Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).

Should I have expected the comatose to dance and/or tell?

notalwaysluminous:

a-certain-life:

It’s finally done!
I based this on part of an Episcopal Eucharistic prayer (Rite II, prayer C for those playing at home) and the stained glass window in notalwaysluminous's avatar.

Love, love, love, love, LOVE THIS!!! 

notalwaysluminous:

a-certain-life:

It’s finally done!

I based this on part of an Episcopal Eucharistic prayer (Rite II, prayer C for those playing at home) and the stained glass window in notalwaysluminous's avatar.

Love, love, love, love, LOVE THIS!!!